Male Warden, 54, Of Women'S Prison In California Is Charged With Sexually Assaulting Female Prisoner | Daily Mail OnlineThis is only the beginning of the surge of arrests at the “rape club” women’s prison, which is known to inmates and employees alike. A federal prison employee admitted to sexually abusing at least two inmates on Thursday, the first conviction in the wave of arrests.

Three other Dublin Federal Correctional Institution officials, including the warden and the chaplain, have been jailed in the last seven months for allegedly sexually assaulting detainees. Other Dublin employees are being investigated as well.

Klinger, a Dublin recycling specialist, admitted to three charges of sexual assault of a child in federal court in Oakland. However, previous identical instances have resulted in penalties ranging from three months to two years in jail. Klinger is still at large while his sentence is being handed out. On the 11th of May, there will be a status meeting.

The Bureau of Prisons stated Friday that Klinger, who was put on administrative leave in April 2021, is still employed by the department. While he was being investigated, he had already been allowed to transfer to another federal prison location.

As part of his plea deal, Klinger signed a paper that wasn’t made public on the court docket. According to a court officer, it was kept under lock and key. It’s not apparent if the deal contains a stipulation compelling him to cooperate with police because it’s not public. Klinger’s and Warden Ray J. Garcia’s cases overlapped, authorities claimed in a court filing last month.

John Paul Reichmuth, Klinger’s attorney, refused to comment.

Toxic and permissive prison culture has allowed predatory workers to commit sexual misconduct for years, and there have been cover-ups that have kept the abuse hidden from the public view, according to an Associated Press investigation published this week.

1974 saw the opening of FCI Dublin, a prison located around 21 miles (34 kilometers) east of Oakland. One of only six federal prisons for women, it underwent a conversion in 2012 and has remained that way since.

At least two inmates were allegedly sexually assaulted by Klinger between March and September 2020, while another inmate was acting as an accomplice. He was caught last June and charged with two counts of sexual assault.

One of the women Klinger proposed to after she was released from a halfway home was given a diamond ring by Klinger, authorities said.

According to the FBI, a prisoner who was aware of Klinger’s mistreatment reported him to the Bureau of Prisons in June 2020. The government approved his transfer to a federal prison in San Diego a few months later.

According to the prosecution, after the transfer, Klinger continued to communicate with one of the victims using a fictitious email address, sending vulgar messages that alluded to sexual conduct. He sent a Snapchat message to the other woman in which he professed his love for her and pledged to do “everything” to make her happy.

While Klinger denied any involvement when he was questioned by investigators in April 2021, he told them that due of the charges against him, his life had already come to an end. Two months later, he was arrested.

It’s impossible to recover from sexual misbehavior by a ward, Klinger said in an interview, according to court filings.

James Theodore Highhouse, a chaplain at the Dublin jail, is due to enter a guilty plea on Feb. 23 to accusations that he sexually assaulted an inmate in 2018 and 2019. Accused of lying to investigators, 49-year-old Highhouse is also accused of sexual assault.

An inmate and another inmate were accused of molestation and forced to strip nude while Garcia, the now-retired warden, was making rounds at the prison in September. Prosecutors said they uncovered photos of the ladies on his government-issued mobile phone.

In February and December of 2020, John Russell Bellhouse, a prison safety administrator, allegedly sexually assaulted an inmate he referred to as his “girlfriend.” His arraignment is expected for this month.

As a result of these and other issues, the federal prison system has been unable to adequately respond to emergencies such as the rapid spread of COVID-19, the failure to adequately combat the epidemic, and the escape of scores of inmates.